Thembalethu Ntuli biography, age, profile, wife & height

Table of Contents

Thembalethu Ntuli a.k.a. Themba Mncube (born 07 March 1991) is a South African actor.

He is famous for playing the role of Pule, a young car guard on Rhythm City. He played the role from May to June 2008.

Profile

Thembalethu Ntuli biography
Image: YouTube/Mehlareng Productions.
NameThembalethu Ntuli
Other namesThemba Mncube
Age30 years old
GenderMale
Date of birth7 March 1991
WifeHope Masilo
ProfessionActor
Height120 cm

Age

Thembalethu Ntuli profile
Image: YouTube/Afternoon Express.

His date of birth is on the 7th of March 1991, he grew up in Ekhuruleni on the East Rand.

Thembalethu Ntuli is 30 years old. He celebrates his birthday every year on March 7th.

Wife

Thembalethu Ntuli wife
Image: YouTube/MzansiCASTER.

Thembalethu is married to Hope Masilo, his longtime sweetheart. Their wedding was held at EnGedi – The Oasis in the Cradle, Muldersdrift.

His bride looked gorgeous in a beaded appliqué gown, while he wore a black tuxedo.

They concluded the wedding the following day with a colorful Zulu wedding in Ntuli’s home township of Vosloorus.

Height

Themba Ntuli hosting Acting Workshop 2/Mehlareng Productions.

According to Sowetanlive, The 28-year-old actor stands at 120cm in height.

Career

He played the role of Pule a young car guard who was adopted by Suffocate, Kilowatt Club owner on Rhythm City, an e.tv soapie.

He is also popular for appearing in television commercials for SABC2 and Sunlight.

Thembalethu’s acting career dates back to his days in primary school and from Grade 8 to his 10th Grade, he took classes in Drama.

He also became a household name by starring in Vodacom ads in 2011.

In 2008, the actor landed a starring role in a brand campaign for SABC2.

He played a starring role fo Cuba in B&B, a eKasi+ / e.tv sitcom, in 2015. 

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